October 15, 2014

Photo of the Week - Lineup of Gristmill Stones




Museum of Appalachia, Clinton, Tennessee

As a (transplanted) Southerner who appreciates regional foods, every time I see one of these old stones, I think of the scrumptious taste of cornbread. Authentic stone ground cornmeal is essential if you want your cornbread to taste the way it is meant to be – with a little bit of crunch.  And, nobody makes cornbread better than Mr. Jim, using an old family recipe and his grandmother's cast iron skillet!

17 comments:

  1. Very nice photo. I didn't realize you were born in the South...how interesting! You 'sound' Southern! hahaha! You've adapted....like my hubby! Have a good day my friend! Hugs, Diane

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  2. Ohhhh...that's the way I like my cornbread, too, except as a Northerner, I add a bit of sugar.

    Those old grinding stones have so much character.

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  3. That's a beautiful shot! I've watched old millstones in action. It's fascinating! Reminds me: Yesterday we drove past an industrial building that had old huge machine gears on display outdoors. Fortunately, I think they were standing in concrete. I hope so, for if one of those fell over on you...

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  4. neat shot and yum, to hot cornbread and a bit of butter!

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  5. Wow...love this photo, Donna. We used to visit Mabry Mill right off the Blue Ridge Parkway near where our cabin was...these old millstones were all around the place. I agree with you about the cornbread...there's nothing like it made in an iron skillet!

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  6. Hot cornbread with butter - yum! Those stones could tell a lot of stories, I bet.

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  7. I'm a cornbread lover myself! Slap on some butter and jam and you have instant dessert.
    I've never had it made the true Southern way though-I bet Jim's corn bread is scrumptious.

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  8. Nice photos! I love cornbread although I suspect I've never tasted real southern cornbread!

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  9. Nice shot of the millstones. I'm a bit hungry for some cornbread now

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  10. Those are great looking millstones. Lucky you that your hubby bakes. :) I do like corn bread but don't make it myself and neither does my hubby!!

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  11. I am enjoying the photos of your Museum of Appalachia...so much character and history!
    Southern cornbread cooked in a skillet...mmmmm...

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  12. Great photo, love corn bread.

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  13. Well, girlfriend, would you kindly post Mr. J's recipe? Let me see if it touches Mr. Sweet's mother's Southern recipe..NO sugar.. I can make both and we can have a tasting contest..I'll invite all my family over and have a TASTE THE CORNBREAD PARTY. lol

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  14. I am of the opinion you can't make truly good cornbread without the cast iron skillet! I grew up on it and should make it that way again. I have the skillet - and I have the cornmeal. Perhaps I will whip some up for one of our rainy Fall evenings! Thanks for the idea. Love your photo!
    ~Adrienne~

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  15. Great photo! I love fried cornbread made from stone ground meal also. I have to get from W. Fla though, probably because it's a family tradition. My mom used to make corn pones also, oh now I'm thinking collard greens, corn pones thick crust; remove the middle and mix with the greens. :)

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  16. Great photo Donna! Yes..love me some cornbread. Sometimes I even put it in milk and eat with a spoon. Mom used to make it Mr. Jim's way! Yum. And I'm with Sally...collard greens!

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  17. Oh Man I would love some of Mr. Jims bread!

    Carol

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Marty, here! Donna loves comments, and I faithfully pass them on to her. Thank you so much for visiting!